The Alexander Technique is a thoughtful way of learning to identify and change harmful habits of movement, tension and reaction. This gradual “unlearning” of lifetime postural habits leads to improved coordination, balance, body awareness and ease. It provides a simple, intelligent way to relieve the pain and stress caused by everyday misuse of your body, from the way we sit at the computer to the way we present ourselves at a business meeting.

The Alexander Technique is about HOW you do, what you do…

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…so you do it more efficiently – with less tension and greater poise.

The Alexander Technique can help you:

  • relieve and prevent pain
  • reduce strain and muscular tension
  • prevent injury
  • improve posture and coordination
  • enhance performance
  • manage stress
  • increase range of motion
  • improve confidence and self-control
  • enjoy greater mind/body awareness


The Alexander Technique offers a way to feel better, and move in a more relaxed and comfortable way… the way nature intended. It’s the intelligent way to use your body!

The Alexander Technique recognizes that the body and mind function as a whole, and that the relationship between the head, neck and back is of paramount importance.

Leaders in the field of medicine and behavioral science have supported the principles of the Alexander Technique. Clinical studies have shown that the Technique improves breathing capacity and posture and modifies stress responses. For those who suffer from chronic pain it offers a method of self-help for long-term relief.

Find out lots more in this blog post by writer Beth Stilborn, in which I was interviewed about the Alexander Technique: and in  “Posture Perfect: Alexander Technique provides a vital, often missing, piece of the wellbeing puzzle,” an article I wrote for Complete Wellbeing Magazine, to find out more (or click here for the pdf version).



To find out more or schedule a lesson, please contact me at 302 384 8454 or

Slide show photographs by Jano Cohen Photography